Saturday, September 11, 2010

Where was I nine years ago?

On that fateful day, I was the nanny to a beautiful 7 month old boy whose parents were both officers in the Navy. Mom was out on a ship, training in the Chesapeake Bay, and Dad was in the Naval Hospital. My own son was in high school, my oldest daughter was in either Texas or Missouri, my youngest daughter was at work nearby on a base as a civilian, and my husband was at work too. My husband called me to say turn on the t.v. and then it started. The fear... of living in the area with the largest concentration of military in the eastern U.S. The calls from family members of the baby and my own family. The steps to gather family close JIC we were next, a very REAL threat. The sudden flurry of jets leaving the area. (I forget whether all the ships stayed in port or moved out to sea...) Tanya, at The Sampler Girl reminded me today of her experiences, which inspired this post. She is right, it DID bring people closer together. I 'inherited' a baby boy for a while due to the base being locked down where dad was, and mom's ship being a first responder in NYC. Schools closed. I packed the baby up and went home. Yes, we were glued to the t.v. most of the day, but we were all together, like a mother hen and her chicks. Most memories fade with time, but that is still very vivid in my mind. Imagine the people all over the world that live with that kind of fear daily... Say a prayer, it is the BEST we can do. Hugs.

4 comments:

Jules said...

Wow, what you went through that day not knowing when the babe would be with his parent's again. Thank God he had you! God Bless You and your family!!!

Carol said...

Living in Portsmouth at the time, I know all too well the fear you speak of. I was so afraid Norfolk would be next or the naval shipyard. I kept asking DH what if?

Sherry said...

As I, too, read Tanya's post, I agree - I had a sister-in-law who had just moved from NOrfolk to Seattle (navy family). Her husband was out to sea, I called her and told her to turn on the news as she was still asleep at that time out west. I was fearful of where my son was and how he was going to get home from elementary school as we were out of district for a short time while waiting to move into a new house. I don't know first hand what it was like to be within minutes of a militiary base, but with my s-i-l living on one, I heard from her first-hand. God bless our militiary and first responders - they did one hell of a job and continue to do so!! And thank goodness for those, like you, they depend(ed) on!

Jessica said...

I remember you calling me that morning. I was cleaning house after breakfast, dancing to the music the girls and I had playing. Just a normal morning. Then the phone rings and its Mom! (still normal we talked all the time) But, then things got weird, you were different on the phone, worried, and you asked if I was watching TV. I said no, you said turn it on. I said which channel, you said "All of them." I will never forget that. I will also never forget not being able to get into contact with my DH all day long and well into the night. He had already gone to work hours before and was on the base. I remember the fear I felt as we heard about units getting ready to ship out from our base, not knowing if he would be among those getting shipped out.

I also remember about 4 years ago when I had to explain to the girls, who were too young to remember it themselves, what had happened that day. A teacher had talked about it in one of their classes at school and was distressed because she had a personal tie to that day. Her stress at the memories were very clear to the class and they came home with questions that the parents got to answer. I remember the fear and the sadness the girls felt as we talked about what happened. I remember their confusion about why it happened. They did not understand how anyone could hate so much that they would do this terrible thing. It affects us all in so many ways. Whether it is remembering the actual events of that day as they unfolded before our eyes, or it is having to explain to our beloved children that there is evil in the world and that on that day it reached out to touch us. Even now as children learn of this event in history for the first time, it has a profound effect on them. I guess, in one way or another, it is a day we will all remember.